FAQs

  1. Can I apply for both the Mary John Goree Las Animas County Scholarship and the Mary John Goree Scholarship at Princeton University?   Yes.
  2. Does the Foundation administer and/or select recipients for the Mary John Goree Scholarship at Princeton University? No. Princeton administers the Mary John Goree Scholarship at Princeton and selects its recipients.
  3. How can I get more information on the Mary John Goree Scholarship at Princeton University? Please go to Our Sister Scholarship: The Mary John Goree Scholarship at Princeton University.
  4. Is there any requirement as to how long an applicant must be a resident of Las Animas County in order to be eligible for the Mary John Goree Las Animas County Scholarship? No. As long as an applicant is a bona fide, legal and actual resident of Las Animas County at the time of the applicant’s selection as a recipient, it doesn’t matter how long the applicant has resided in Las Animas County. However, the Board will strictly scrutinize the residency of applicants who arrive in Las Animas County at or after the beginning of their senior year in high school to ensure that they have indeed satisfied the residency requirement.
  5. Do I have to remain a Las Animas County resident after I have been selected as a recipient in order to retain my scholarship? No. As long as you were a legal, bona fide and actual resident of Las Animas County at the time of your selection, you will not lose your scholarship on account of a change in residence subsequent to your selection.
  6. Do I have to attend high school in Las Animas County in order to be eligible for the Mary John Goree Las Animas County Scholarship? No. Eligibility for the Mary John Goree Las Animas County Scholarship is based strictly upon residence in Las Animas County. The location of a student’s high school is irrelevant for this purpose.
  7. I’m uncertain if I satisfy the residency requirement.  Is there a way that I can determine if I’m eligible?  Yes.  To avoid disappointment and to facilitate planning for financing your education, we invite prospective applicants (including underclass students) and their families to contact us by emailing David Vandermeulen at dvandermeulen@sprynet.com with any questions you may have about your residency status.
  8. For purposes of the prerequisite based upon GPA, do you count grades earned at junior colleges or four-year colleges? We will count such grades if they appear as concurrent courses on a student’s high school transcript(s). For purposes of determining whether a student has met the eligibility requirement of a 3.5 GPA, we will not count such grades if they appear solely on a separate junior college or four-year college transcript. However, for purposes of evaluating the academic performance and future academic promise of eligible applicants, we will look at grades earned in courses listed solely on junior and four-year college transcripts as well as those for junior and four-year college courses listed concurrently on the high school transcript(s) if taken no later than the end of the applicant’s 11th grade year.
  9. For purposes of the prerequisite based upon GPA, do you make any adjustments to grades on the high school transcript(s) on account of the difficulty of the curriculum taken or differences in high school grading systems (e.g., whether a high school permits students to earn a 5-point A for certain courses or whether a high school permits or doesn’t permit A+’s to be awarded)? No. Solely for purposes of determining whether a student has satisfied the prerequisite of a 3.5 GPA, we use the GPA exactly as computed by the student’s high school(s). To take into account possible differences in grading systems or unusual situations, we have made it possible to also meet the eligibility requirement through ACT or SAT scores. However, for purposes of evaluating the academic performance and future academic promise of eligible applicants, we will take into account the difficulty of the curriculum the student has undertaken and differences in high school grading systems in analyzing a student’s transcript(s).
  10. What advice would you give to high school underclass students with respect to course selection in high school?  A successful applicant’s curriculum will be strong in traditional college-preparatory courses in the core subjects of English, mathematics, foreign language, social studies and science (including biology, physics and chemistry). The Board believes that traditional college-preparatory courses should not be neglected in favor of vocational courses or elective courses outside of the core subjects that are more appropriately taken in college.
  11. What is the Board’s recommendation with respect to pass-fail courses?  Keep pass-fail classes to a minimum. When reviewing transcripts, the Board is assessing the readiness of an applicant to undertake a demanding college curriculum. It is difficult for the Board to be confident that an applicant has the necessary readiness if his/her transcript contains a significant number of pass-fail courses, particularly if those pass-fail courses are in the core subject areas of English, mathematics, social studies, science and foreign language.
  12. If I’ve taken a standardized test (ACT, SAT or SAT Subject Test) more than once, which score do you count or do you average them? Both for purposes of determining whether an applicant has met the standardized test prerequisite and for evaluating eligible applicants, we will count only the highest ACT composite score and the highest score achieved on each subsection (math and evidence-based reading and writing) of the SAT. For purposes of evaluating eligible applicants, we will look at the highest score achieved on any particular SAT Subject Test.
  13. I did better on the SAT than I did on the ACT. Which score will you count in evaluating my application? We will consider only the test in which you placed in the higher percentile, so, for example, if you scored in the 80th percentile on the ACT and in the 90th percentile in the SAT, we will consider only your SAT score.
  14. Your website states that you will consider Advanced Placement test scores. My high school doesn’t offer Advanced Placement courses. Am I at a disadvantage? Taking Advanced Placement courses is one way that a student can take a more demanding academic curriculum and demonstrate future academic promise, but it’s not the only way to do so. Other possibilities include taking dual-enrollment courses at a junior or four-year college or honors classes within your high school.
  15. By the end of my senior year in high school, I expect to have earned enough credits for my Associate’s degree. Can I apply for the Scholarship? As long as you have not enrolled as a full-time student in a junior or four-year college, you can apply for the Scholarship.
  16. If I’m a Las Animas Goree Scholarship recipient and I receive my bachelor’s degree in three years or less, can I use my scholarship for graduate study? No. Scholarships terminate after four years or a bachelor’s degree is earned, whichever comes first.
  17. Will I receive any notification that my application is incomplete or that supporting documents are missing? If you have gone to the application portal and registered, you will receive an email notification 10 days before the deadline if your application is incomplete or supporting documents are missing.
  18. When will I learn if I’m a finalist and will be asked to interview?   You will be informed of your status by November 20, 2017.
  19. How soon after my interview will I learn whether I’ve received a scholarship? Recipient(s) will be announced within two weeks of the interviews. An alternate list may be created.
  20. If I’m offered a Las Animas Goree Scholarship, what is the deadline for accepting the scholarship and when must I inform the Foundation of my college choice? You have until May 1 to inform the Foundation whether you are accepting the Scholarship. At the same time that you accept the Scholarship, you must also inform the Foundation of your college choice and provide required financial aid documentation if you are seeking a need-based award in addition to your minimum award (see Scholarship Awards).
  21. What is the timeline for applying for a Mary John Goree Las Animas County Scholarship? The application process for Fall 2017 opens September 2, 2017, and the deadline for submitting all materials is October 16, 2017.  See our Process for a complete list of relevant dates.  

Submit an application.